What Gives Red Bull Wings? Creating a Successful Market-Oriented Organization

What Gives Red Bull Wings? Creating a Successful Market-Oriented Organization

There is no question that from its inception, Red Bull has been an extremely special company. (Thompson, Rindfleisch, and Arsel 2006) at every touch point. But that’s not all; Red Bull takes a market-orientation and customer experience design approach, radiating the brand from the inside out. 

Building Retro Brands: Harley Davidson and the 4 As

Building Retro Brands: Harley Davidson and the 4 As

After a seemingly unstoppable growth period during the beginning of the 21st century, the iconic American brand Harley Davidson was in serious trouble. Not only did the 2008 global economic crisis hit it hard, but more importantly, its core target market was shrinking fast (Seizemore 2013). Composed primarily of American Baby Boomer males, this aging demographic had plenty of disposable income and sought an escape from the monotony of daily life by indulging their long-lost aspirations of rebellion (Holt 2004). As profitable as this market segment once was, Harley Davidson had no choice but to shift branding gears and create new customer experiences.

Adjusting Your Marketing Across Cultures

Adjusting Your Marketing Across Cultures

Celebrating getting the book through Turkish customs, the absurdity of waiting and paying for your own work reminded me of cultural differences. In 1966, Cateora and Hess wrote “Marketing principles are universally applicable, and the marketer’s task is the same whether applied in Dimebox, Texas or Katmandu, Nepal.” Today we know better: even with global technologies and economic development, cultural differences abound and affect a marketer’s job.

Customer Experience is the New Marketing

Customer Experience is the New Marketing

Steve Cannon, President and CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA

Putting the Magic in CMO

Putting the Magic in CMO

Rich Karlgaard, in his Innovation Rules column in Forbes, suggests that two C-suite roles that are sure to change are the chief information officer (CIO) and chief marketing officer (CMO). “The CMO will spend less time communicating to the outside world and more time shaping the inside story,” writes Karlgaard. “What else can hold a liquid organization together, but purpose, values and story?”